HELEN BAYNE

Researcher, senior lecturer and sport scientist based in South Africa. My work is influenced by my experience as an athlete, coach, student, teacher, biomechanist, clinician and scientist. I invite you to learn more about this work below.

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THE STORY, SO FAR

With a background in gymnastics, as a coach and athlete, I took the first steps in my career in sport science through undergraduate studies at the University of Pretoria and the University of Cape Town. I then worked in clinical practice as a biokineticist in Johannesburg for a number of years, with a special interest in sports injury rehabilitation. My PhD studies took me to Perth and the University of Western Australia, where I researched cricket fast bowling biomechanics and lumbar injury mechanisms. Since returning to South Africa I have worked at the University of Pretoria, initially as the head of biomechanics at the High Performance Centre and now as a researcher and lecturer in the Faculty of Health Sciences, where I am also a member of the advisory board of the Sport, Exercise Medicine and Lifestyle Institute (SEMLI). 

My work has been published and presented for academic, clinical, and coaching audiences. I have consulted to numerous sports organisations (including Athletics South Africa, the International Cricket Council, and Cricket South Africa), and served on the boards and committees of organisations such as the International Society of Biomechanics in Sport and the South African Sports Medicine Association. I am the co-founder and chairperson of the South African Society of Biomechanics, which aims to support the growth of the field locally.  

 

RESEARCH INTERESTS

Fast bowling biomechanics

SPORTS INJURY MECHANISMS

Quantification of movement patterns and mechanical load associated with increased risk of injury

Sprint mechanics

CAPACITY, COORDINATION AND COACHING

Investigation of strength, technique and training to enhance athletic performance

Sprint force velocity power

FIELD-BASED BIOMECHANICS

Using wearable technology and portable devices to take biomechanical analyses out of the lab and into the field